feminist killjoy reporting for duty

carlboygenius:

People Lying in a Week’s Worth of their Trash

Photo Series by Gregg Segal

Source: www.slate.com

The average American in 2014 produces 4-pounds of garbage per day per person. That is twice the personal garbage production rate of Americans in 1960.

An abandoned Victorian tree house somewhere in South Florida

likeafieldmouse:

Yosemite Firefall

"The Yosemite Firefall was a summertime event that began in 1872 and continued for almost a century, in which burning hot embers were spilled from the top of Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park to the valley 3,000 feet below.

It was conducted by the owners of the Glacier Point Hotel. The firefalls ended in January 1968 when the National Park Service ordered it to stop because of the overwhelming number of visitors it attracted, plus the fact that it was not a natural event. The hotel itself was destroyed by fire one year later and was not rebuilt.

The Firefalls were performed at 9pm seven nights a week.”

archiemcphee:

The Atlanta Botanical Garden us currently hosting an awesome outdoor exhibition of mosaiculture sculptures created in Canada by Mosaïcultures Internationales de Montréal (previously featured here). Mosaiculture, while similar to topiary, “is a refined horticultural art that involves creating and mounting living artworks made primarily from plants with colourful foliage (generally annuals, and occasionally perennials).”

"Each sculpture is a living, sophisticated evolution of the traditional ‘stuffed topiary technique," states the Garden. "Thousands of meticulously groomed annuals are planted into soil-and-sphagnum moss filled netting covering the steel forms – hidden works of artisanship themselves – to carpet the skeletons in colorful patterns. Complex irrigation systems beneath the surface of the sculptures allow the plants to grow – and the creatures to flourish – in Atlanta’s summer heat."

Entitled Imaginary Worlds, the exhibition features 28 living, growing sculptures, including an amazing pink unicorn and at least two different ape species (Less talk, more topiary monkeys!), and runs through October 2014.

Visit My Modern Metropolis for additional images.

oessa:

Cancun Underwater Museum, Mexico. 21°11’59.4”N 86°42’45.4”W
celestiol:

Ghiannis D. | by Ivo Vaessen

celestiol:

Ghiannis D. | by Ivo Vaessen

ancienttimenews:

Lost Kingdom Of Cleopatra

Off the shores of Alexandria, the city of Alexander the Great, lies what is believed to be the ruins of the royal quarters of Cleopatra. A team of marine archaeologists led by Frenchman Franck Goddio made excavation on this ancient city from where Cleopatra, the last queen of the Ptolemies, ruled Egypt. Historians believe this site was submerged by earthquakes and tidal waves more than 1,600 years ago.

The excavations concentrated on the submerged island of Antirhodus. Cleopatra is said to have had a palace there. Other discoveries include a well-preserved shipwreck and red granite columns with Greek inscriptions. There were also founded two statues which were lifted out of the harbor. One was a priest of the goddess Isis; the other a sphinx whose face is said to represent Cleopatra’s father, King Ptolemy XII. The artifacts were returned to their silent, because the Egyptian Government says it wants to leave most of them in place to create an underwater museum

Source 1  Source 2  Source 3

 

ianbrooks:

Made You Look by Mobstr

Part of Poland’s Katowice Street Art Festival, Mobstr totally made you look. He did, just admit it. If you’re in Katowice, you can find this mural on ul. Lelewela 3.

Artist: Website (via: Street Art News)

visitheworld:

Yuanyang Rice Terraces in Yunnan, China (by ichauvel).

visitheworld:

Yuanyang Rice Terraces in Yunnan, China (by ichauvel).

oogielover:

theremina:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings.

For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement.

The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery

cosascool:

Giant Wooden Spheres Made from Interlocking Wood by Lee Jae-Hyo

likeafieldmouse:

Cliff Briggie - Ice (Ongoing project) - Ice and paint photography

arpeggia:

Robert Polidori - New Orleans, 2005-2006

See also: Versailles

joebagofdoughnuts:

I can’t really explain why, but abandoned places like this have always fascinated me. Maybe it’s the stories they can tell. So much more interesting than the cut and paste type of architecture that has become the norm today….